Fish Out Of Water: I Wish I Could Swim

4/5

Written by Luke Barnes

Summary

A tale of anxiety, woe and the ocean blue.

As some of you may know if you have been reading my reviews for a while, I like poetry. I have dabbled at it a fair bit in the past to mixed degrees of success, it’s a fickle thing. As such I am impressed that this film managed to condense its entire narrative into one poem, and that from that poem the film is able to go in many different directions and illicit so many different emotions.

I often found this film to be deep and surprisingly thoughtful, it made me smile as much as it made me think and broadly ponder. I thought the film was quite true in a lot of the things it was saying about anxiety disorder and the struggles those of us who have it have to go through. It felt very real and human.

My one critique of the film would be that it is too short. I mean that both in terms of I wanted more but also in that I think the film could have done with a few extra minutes to flesh out some of its themes and deeper meanings.

Overall, a beautifully unique film.

Pros.

How it covered dealing with anxiety

The emotion

The poem

The cinematography

Cons.

It is too short

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Burn: There Is No Need To Panic

4/5

Written by Luke Barnes

Summary

The film follows a child, played by Matti Kolirin,  born into an unkind world with themes of national panic and personal tragedy.

I found this to be a surprisingly affecting horror film for a number of reasons, firstly the film does a good job in making us care about the child, their experiences, and how they are growing up, so therefore as things begin to happen you care about the fate of the character. Secondly there is more than enough of our modern times reflected in the film, even though it was made a number of years ago, maybe I am reading into it but I saw a lot of home truths reflective of our current hyper panicked world.

I thought the performances across the board were all strong, I believed the family bond and thought each of the actors played off each other well. I was thoroughly convinced.

My only real criticism of the film would be that there were some pacing issues especially towards the start that really slowed the film down, if it weren’t for them this film could be sweeping full marks

Overall, I related to this film quite a lot and found myself moved by it as well as a little disconcerted.

Pros.

The performances

The ending

The emotion

The relatability

Cons.

Pacing issues  

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Confessions Of A Haunting: Passing On

Written by Luke Barnes

Confessions of a Haunting is a horror, drama short film directed by Andre J.D Robinson. The plot sees a woman (Julie Mainville) talk into an online confessional about a recent loss she has suffered in her family, as she does a voice can be heard talking back- presumably a voice from the other-side.

I will never cease to be surprised by the wonders filmmakers are achieving during lockdown. Though the premise and set up of this film are quite simple, they are used to great effect, both in terms of horror and drama.

On the drama side of things, the monologue delivered by Mainville is deeply personal and touching. We have all lost someone in our lives, or most at least, and can relate to what she is going through. The dialogue manages to become affecting and have an emotional impact which is always a positive sign.

In terms of horror, when we first hear the voice from the other-side it is shocking, because as you approach the midpoint you think that the short will be about this person coming to terms with their loss and that the horror on display will be emotional. However, when it does take a supernatural turn it is surprising and unnerving and you being to question what is happening.

Overall, a sad and creepy affair that is made as strong as it is by the writing.

Pros.

It is well written

It makes you feel something

The supernatural turn is unexpected

Mainville

Cons.

Could do with further expansion, maybe a few extra minutes

4/5

Cursed Camera: Video Killed…. Well Everyone

Written by Luke Barnes

Cursed Camera is a horror short directed by Hunter Farris. The plot sees a group of budding filmmakers become the unwitting victims of a demon after they start using a cursed camera that kills those who appear on its lens.

This is what horror cinema is all about, the wonderful shorts that breath life back into the genre! I greatly enjoyed this film for the short time it was on, as I thought it was very clever and it made me laugh.

If you have ever made a short yourself before, then you will find the premise itself quite hilarious and more than a little relatable. Moreover, I think the film’s lampoon of possession tropes is spot on, and I was laughing for the entire runtime of the film.

 I thought the acting was also quite good, and even though each character was only on screen a minute amount of time before they are killed off most still have their moment to shine and for the most part nail it.

Overall, this was a lot of fun to watch and if you have a spare few minutes you should definitely check it out, eagerly awaiting what the filmmaker does next.

Pros.

A novel premise

A strong lampoon

Many funny scenes

The cast are strong

The ending perfectly sets up more fun

Cons.

None

5/5